UK Schools use Biometrics For Lunch Money

June 14, 2012 - 

Some UK students can now pay for their meals at the school cafeteria by using their fingerprints.

Two schools, Nova Hreod in Moredon and Isambard in North Swindon, will be using biometric technology as currency with regards to financial transactions. The new technology will also help in making record keeping at the school a lot more efficient.

Some parents have expressed their apprehension with the technology, fearing that their children may be put under unnecessary risk. However, proponents of the project assure parents that the biometric data gathered from their children are converted into mathematical algorithms which basically render it useless to any other system outside of the school. Furthermore, students’ biometric information is deleted the moment he graduates or leaves the school.

Schools Minister Nick Gibb said, “Biometrics in schools in a sensitive issue,” as reported by local newspaper Swindon Advertiser. “We want schools to be in no doubt of their responsibilities when it comes to young people’s personal data. The new legislation gives the power back to parents, as it requires parental consent before the information can be collected.”

The need to use biometrics as currency will help in the prevention of theft and even bullying in school. Children can have their fingerprints taken or have their facial scans a week before July 16th. In the event that parents still feel a little apprehensive about the new system, they can always have their children pay their meals using another form of identification.

Several other schools have already implemented fingerprinting and facial scan systems in order to facilitate simple services such as attendance recording or registration of library loans. Currently, most schools are using the swipe card system for identification verification.

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About Stephen Mayhew

Stephen Mayhew is the publisher and co-founder of Biometrics Research Group, Inc.. His experience includes a mix of entrepreneurship, brand development and publishing. Stephen attended Carleton University and lives in Toronto, Canada. Connect with Stephen on LinkindIn.