DNA markers to authenticate military electronic devices

September 5, 2012 - 

The US Department of Defense recently awarded Applied DNA Sciences, Inc. a contract for microcircuit authentication.

The company is best known for their DNA-based anti-counterfeiting and security solutions. Applied DNA Sciences will be authenticating microcircuits supplied by other contractors by providing a DNA mark on these items before they are turned over for government use.

The contract was approved by the Department’s Defense Logistics Agency.

The DNA markers to be used in the microcircuits are plant-based and deemed counterfeit proof. The DNA was found to be immune to forgery after several tests were conducted. None of the testing laboratories were able to break the technology successfully. The technology was tested for 18 months.

The DNA marker will be distributed to microchip makers while a different verification-marking program will be sold to distributors to verify their products.

Companies who are currently under contract with the government will need to comply with a new marking requirement. DNA marking will be an imperative on all microcircuits that are considered to be used in high risk applications and will be applied to all contractors signed with the DOD and all of its branches, especially those dealing with national security and intelligence.

Can plant-based DNA markers also be used in other industries for security verification of electronics?

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About Mona Green

Mona Green writes full time for biometricupdate.com. She is also a licensed Medical Laboratory Scientist and is currently involved in several civic society organizations. Mona is completing her Master's Degree in Public Administration."