New DigitalPersona fingerprint readers to be used in India

October 31, 2012 - 

The new DigitalPersona, Inc. family of U.are.U 5100 fingerprint modules and readers will be used for India’s UID project.

The goal of India’s “unique identity” project is to roll out trustworthy, non-duplicated identity numbers for the country’s entire population based on biometric and other data.

The touch-style U.are.U 5100 fingerprint module is a PIV-certified, optical fingerprint sensor specifically tailored to fit the unique form-factor, power, usability and durability requirements of mobile devices.

It makes high-efficiency, standards-compliant biometrics practical for handheld ID terminals and other devices used in Civil ID applications such as voting, benefits-checking and micro-finance. The U.are.U 5100 fingerprint module will be available mid-November.

“Countries creating national biometric databases are turning to mobile ID terminals as a way to provide fraud-free distribution of entitlements and social services. Vendor options for integrating fingerprint biometrics have been limited because of power consumption, size, durability and standards compliance,” said Chris Trytten, director of product management at DigitalPersona. “The U.are.U 5100 family of fingerprint sensors enables standards-based biometric mobile ID solutions to be smaller, power friendly, longer lasting and more affordable.”

It is anticipated that the device will be quickly adopted in fast growing markets like India. “Smart ID is pleased to team up with DigitalPersona to bring their new PIV fingerprint reader to the Indian market,” said Nirmal Prakash, managing director at Smart Identity Devices Pvt. Ltd. “DigitalPersona’s high-volume manufacturing experience makes them the ideal supplier of high performance, low cost PIV fingerprint readers for India’s UID project.”

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About Stephen Mayhew

Stephen Mayhew is the publisher and co-founder of Biometrics Research Group, Inc.. His experience includes a mix of entrepreneurship, brand development and publishing. Stephen attended Carleton University and lives in Toronto, Canada. Connect with Stephen on LinkindIn.