Fingerprint Cards issues preliminary forecast, expects huge gains and market share

Fingerprint Cards has issued a preliminary forecast for 2014, amid growing interest in the company which specializes in manufacturing fingerprint sensors to be used in consumer devices.

According to the company’s board of directors, the new forecast has been published following ongoing interest after Apple’s TouchID launch last week, as well as ahead of imminent meetings with investors and analysts.

Specifically, FPC expects that its sales in the third quarter of 2013 will be in the range of SEK 27-33M. Previously, the company forecasted this range to be 20-30M SEK.

Fingerprint Cards also expects sales to exceed SEK 500M in 2014, as well as to report profitability by Q3 2014 with EBITDA margins exceeding 20% for the full year and approaching 30% by Q4 2014.

In addition, FPC says it expects that all Tier 1 smartphone OEMs will include capacitive fingerprint sensors in their flagship models by the end of 2014, and that the market for integrated sensors in consumer electronics will be in excess of 500 million units in 2014. By 2015, FPC thinks that the market will be in excess of 3 billion units and that as a company it will occupy a 60% share (excluding Apple).

The company is also planning a new touch sensor for launch in early 2014.

Reported previously, World Wide Touch Technology recently launched its line of FingerQ smartphone cases with embedded Fingerprint Cards fingerprint sensors. 

Fingerprint Cards recently received a significant design win from one of its existing Asian OEM customers, for a smartphone scheduled to be launched by a top US operators in the first quarter of 2014.

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