GE Healthcare Life Sciences and NetBio announce multi-lab testing of rapid DNA technology

May 6, 2014 - 

GE Healthcare Life Sciences and NetBio have announced a multi-laboratory developmental validation of its DNAscan biometric rapid DNA analysis system.

According to the companies, leading international and US accredited NDIS participating forensic laboratories are each independently evaluating the overall system from “swab-in to profile-out,” including the on-board software which uses automated data interpretation to limit human review.

Results from this validation process – which includes meeting an extensive set of FBI Quality Assurance Standards – will be used to seek NDIS approval to enable forensic laboratories to sumbit profiles generated by the DNAscan System to CODIS.

“Law enforcement agencies routinely look to us for guidance on cutting edge forensic technologies. Rapid DNA analysis technology has the potential to be a powerful investigative tool for law enforcement, but it must be held to the same strict standards as existing analytical methods,” Angelo Della Manna, Chief of Forensic Biology and DNA, Alabama Department of Forensic Sciences said. “As an internationally accredited laboratory and one of the original members of the CODIS pilot program more than 20 years ago, we have a responsibility to assess Rapid DNA and provide guidance about its technical robustness and efficacy for the law enforcement community.”

“Crucial to our responsible adoption approach is working with accredited laboratories that have highly respected technical experts from the forensic and law enforcement communities.” Mike Benevento, General Manager, Human Identification, GE Healthcare Life Sciences said. “Their involvement strengthens our efforts and brings us an important step closer to a fully integrated Rapid DNA system approved for use as part of the overall booking process.”

In addition to NetBio, laboratories participating in the development validation of the DNAscan System include the Alabama Department of Forensic Sciences, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, the Michigan State Police, and the Dubai Police Crime Laboratory.

Reported previously, in 2012, the University of North Texas was set to conduct Rapid DNA tests on behalf of the U.S. Department of Defense. 

Rawlson King, the Biometrics Research Group’s lead researcher and a contributing editor to BiometricUpdate.com writes that rapid DNA is not science fiction, and is quickly becoming a reality with several government agencies looking at the technology today.

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About Adam Vrankulj

Adam Vrankulj is an editor for BiometricUpdate.com. His background consists of online news writing, editing and content marketing. Adam has written for CBCNews.ca, BlogTO and was the editor and curator for the nextMEDIA and CIX Source publications. He has a degree in journalism and is passionate about science, technology and social innovation. Contact Adam, or follow him at @adamvrankulj