Skullcandy, USC launch contest to promote innovation in biometrics, fitness tracking and music

August 29, 2014 - 

The University of Southern California’ Center for Body Computing department has partnered with headphone manufacturer Skullcandy to launch an innovation contest to encourage development efforts in a culmination of biometrics, fitness tracking, and music.

On October 2, four finalists will present their ideas to a panel of expert judges on how they can use music in a way that helps consumers better understand their personal health.

The final winner will receive a $10,000 prize, as well as the chance to present his or her idea live onstage at the USC campus on October 3 at the 8th annual USC Center for Body Computing Conference.

The annual USC CBC SLAM contest promotes creative, next-generation digital health innovation by educating consumers on how they can understand their own health or make changes to their daily behavior for a healthier lifestyle.

Previous winners of the contest have included LumoBack, a start-up with a posture sensor, and Vampire Rancher, a mobile social gaming platform for children with diabetes.

Individuals interested in finding more information on how they can submit a proposal can visit the USC CBC website.

All proposals must be in by September 22 and contest organizers will select the finalists for the live pitch in Los Angeles by September 26.

“Through the birth of on-demand mobile music platforms and small wireless body-worn sensors, we now have the technology to build innovative products that incorporate and tailor music to the signals our bodies generate,” said Leslie Saxon. M.D., a cardiologist and executive director and founder of the USC Center for Body Computing. “The support and collaboration with Skullcandy, takes this year’s USC CBC SLAM event to a whole new level where music becomes the driver for human potential and personal health empowerment.”

Skullcandy is sponsoring the USC CBC SLAM event and has also become a partner of USC for future research that shows the impact of music and biometrics.

“We know how powerful music can be whether it is inspiring athletic accomplishments, alleviating stress or its therapeutic affect on those with Parkinson’s disease, depression and Alzheimer’s,” said Skullcandy CEO Hoby Darling. “Our involvement with USC extends our reach beyond sports and entertainment to have meaningful impact on health – heart rates, brainwaves, mood. We see this collaboration with USC’s Center for Body Computing as a perfect marriage where we both have the same future vision: help people live better lives.”

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About Stephen Mayhew

Stephen Mayhew is the publisher and co-founder of Biometrics Research Group, Inc.. His experience includes a mix of entrepreneurship, brand development and publishing. Stephen attended Carleton University and lives in Toronto, Canada. Connect with Stephen on LinkindIn.