Korean startup FiveGT develops facial recognition-based home security device

March 4, 2015 - 

South Korean facial recognition solutions startup FiveGT developed Ufacekey, a facial recognition-based home security device that eliminates the need for keys or password systems, according to a report by the Korean Herald.

“Home security systems have been changing over time and in the near future people will not have to carry a bunch of metal keys or key cards as smart home systems with facial recognition technology will recognize residents as soon as they arrive at their front door,” said FiveGT CEO Jeong Gyu-taek. “Ufacekey, a facial recognition device designed for home automation systems is intuitive, fast and precise.”

FiveGT’s facial scanner can differentiate between identical twins as well as identify users with or without glasses.

Additionally, Ufacekey features an infrared camera that can identify users in any lighting — even in complete darkness.

Once users register their biometric data with Ufacekey, which takes under 10 seconds, they will be able to authenticate themselves at any point thereafter in less than a second.

The device’s software keeps up-to-date biometric data on users, while any slight alterations, such as weight gain, will not impact the recognition rate, said the company.

FiveGT currently has partnerships with security firm ADT Caps and mobile carrier SK Telecom, and has received proposals from various companies that are looking to integrate the biometric device into their security or smart home systems.

Ufacekey can also send photos of an individual who attempts to enter a home to the resident’s smartphones, who can then decide whether to grant person access or notify the police.

Family members can also use Ufacekey to share voice or photo messages, then check the messages once they enter their home.

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About Stephen Mayhew

Stephen Mayhew is the publisher and co-founder of Biometrics Research Group, Inc.. His experience includes a mix of entrepreneurship, brand development and publishing. Stephen attended Carleton University and lives in Toronto, Canada. Connect with Stephen on LinkindIn.