Smart gun bill proposed for California

March 31, 2015 - 

A California state senator introduced a measure that would make it illegal to give another individual a smart gun that fail to meet certain requirements, according to a report by Guns.com.

Filed in the state Senate last month, the new bill details various specifications that a smart gun sold in California state would have to adhere to before it could be given to another person.

However, selling a smart gun that fails to follow the same requirements would only be considered a misdemeanor.

“The bill would define a user-authorized firearm as a firearm that will only fire when activated by an authorized user,” reads the introduction filed by Senator Jerry Hill (D-San Mateo).

Senate Bill 678, which is scheduled for hearing with the Public Safety Committee on April 14, would mandate a list of 10 requirements before a smart gun can be given to an individual.

One of the requirements is that the firearm must be approved by a laboratory certified by the U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center.

Additionally, the smart gun is required to use a range of identification methods, including “biometrics, radio frequency tagging, touch memory, fingerprint recognition, palm print recognition, grip recognition, magnetic encoding, retinal recognition, iris recognition, and other means of utilizing biometric or electronic systems.”

Smart gun supports call the technology an important safety measure that can help disable stolen or lost guns, and ultimately reduce unauthorized use of firearms and unnecessary deaths that occur each year.

Meanwhile, critics have said the technology is immature, citing recent research that found that approximately three-quarters of the general public have said they would not purchase a smart gun or trust its reliability, and that the government should not mandate the technology.

Previously reported, Boulder, Colorado high school student Kai Kloepfer received a $50,000 grant from the Smart Tech Challenges Foundation to continue developing a biometric sensor that prevents unauthorized individuals from firing a weapon.

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About Justin Lee

Justin Lee has been a contributor with Biometric Update since 2014. Previously, he was a staff writer for web hosting magazine and website, theWHIR. For more than a decade, Justin has written for various publications on issues relating to technology, arts and culture, and entertainment. Follow him on Twitter @BiometricJustin.