Fujitsu to release portable USB palm vein authentication sensor for mobile devices

June 16, 2015 - 

Fujitsu Limited and Fujitsu Frontech will soon release a new portable palm vein sensor that can connect directly to USB ports, as part of the FUJITSU Biometric Authentication PalmSecure-SL sensor line of contactless palm vein authentication devices for enterprises.

The portable palm sensor, which will be available for sale in Japan in late September, can directly connect to USB ports.

This capability ensures that customers will no longer have to use USB cables with mobile applications, making it more convenient to use with mobile devices.

The portable version of PalmSecure-SL uses the same sensor as the existing line of PalmSecure-SL Sensors, with some added features.

The new sensor rapidly and continuously captures images of the user’s palm and automatically selects the best image for authentication purposes.

It then cross checks the palm vein data against the registered data, eliminating the need for a brace to hold the hand steady. Instead, users are able to wave their hand over the sensor to accurately authenticate themselves.

The sensor can also be used in tandem with existing line of PalmSecure-SL sensors. Those customers who are already using the mouse-type sensor or standard sensor of the PalmSecure-SL Sensor line can add the new product for use in mobile settings.

As a result, users can authenticate with the standard sensor when at their office, and connect the portable sensor to their smart device when they are in the field.

The sensor has a number of benefits, including the fact that nearly all people are able to register, is hygienic as a result of being a completely contactless authentication device, and has a high accuracy rate.

In recent authentication trials within the Fujitsu Group, the sensor demonstrated high authentication accuracy, with a false acceptance rate of less than 0.00008% and a false rejection rate of only 0.01%.

Leave a Comment

comments

About Justin Lee

Justin Lee has been a contributor with Biometric Update since 2014. Previously, he was a staff writer for web hosting magazine and website, theWHIR. For more than a decade, Justin has written for various publications on issues relating to technology, arts and culture, and entertainment. Follow him on Twitter @BiometricJustin.