CrimTrac seeking supplier to build more versatile national biometric identification database

July 8, 2015 - 

Australian crime data authority CrimTrac is seeking more flexibility in accessing other databases, such as national location data, as it slowly shifts to becoming a fully functional national biometric identification system, according to a report by Australian Financial Review.

The organization is looking for a specialist IT supplier to provide a more versatile operating installation which is able to integrate a wide range of new technologies as they emerged, as well as handle the expanding list of mobile devices being used in the field by policing agencies.

After a detailed industry briefing held on June 25th, Australian tenders firm TenderSearch has circled August 6th as the closing date for all companies interested in submitting their bid.

After this point, TenderSearch will take until the end of the year or early next year to decide on the preferred supplier, with implementation taking place around May 2016.

The lengthy schedule poses a dilemma for CrimTrac as the organization decides whether to stay with its existing supplier, or hire a replacement.

The contract has an initial five year term with the option of extending it to another five years, based on CrimTrac’s discretion.

The current tender follows up last year’s detailed ICT plans for expansion and refocusing of CrimTrac’s services over the 2014-2018 period.

The tender documents feature a large batch of detailed technical data on biometric identification services including palm prints, footprints and facial recognition.

However, there is still a significant amount of high security, high level data which will only be provided to those suppliers with a high level of credentials and security clearance, after they complete the necessary confidentiality requirements.

CrimTrac is expected to introduce more biometric techniques in the database in the near future.

Previously reported, CrimTrac is seeking to add facial recognition capabilities to the national fingerprint database, which police and law enforcement agencies use to match collected biometrics to criminals and suspects,

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About Justin Lee

Justin Lee has been a contributor with Biometric Update since 2014. Previously, he was a staff writer for web hosting magazine and website, theWHIR. For more than a decade, Justin has written for various publications on issues relating to technology, arts and culture, and entertainment. Follow him on Twitter @BiometricJustin.