EyeVerify releases independent accuracy testing results

September 16, 2015 - 

EyeVerify announced that three independent organizations have conducted extensive accuracy testing on its Eyeprint ID, in which the biometrics solution performed at accuracy levels that meet the market need for secure mobile authentication for password replacement, medical prescriptions and mobile payments.

Two studies conducted in different countries — one in the United States and the other in China — assessed the False Reject Rate (FRR) at various False Accept Rates (FAR).

In both studies, each FAR corresponds to market acceptable security levels for phone unlock, general password replacement and authentication for mobile payments.

Both studies demonstrate that Eyeprint ID meets the strict accuracy requirements for mobile payments.

The University of Missouri performed their independent data collection back in May using 500-plus subjects and two device types. The study’s accuracy results are shown below.

Eyeverify-University-Results

A large technology company in China conducted another study in July using 200-plus subjects and two device types.

To further demonstrate the independence of this test, EyeVerify has only seen the study’s results and not seen the actual images used. The study’s accuracy results are shown below.

Eyeverify-Chinese-results

The complete results of both independent studies, shown side-by-side, can be downloaded in EyeVerify’s new white paper.

In another study, independent testing and quality assurance lab iBeta tested Eyeprint ID back in April part of the certification process to determine if the solution meets Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) biometric subsystem requirements for inclusion in an Electronic Prescription of Controlled Substances (EPCS) application.

The test, which involved 118 subjects in iBeta’s Colorado lab, determined that Eyeprint ID meets the False Match Rate (FMR) requirement of 0.001 or lower with a 95 percent confidence rate.

The report also found that the use of eyeglasses while using Eyepring ID did not significantly affect the FMR.

iBeta’s certification of Eyeprint ID confirms that the solution is secure enough for a doctor to use to authenticate when issuing electronic prescriptions.

The full report can be viewed on ibeta.com.

Previously reported, EyeVerify is now providing Eyeprint ID authentication technology for First Internet Bank to use in its personal mobile banking application.

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About Justin Lee

Justin Lee has been a contributor with Biometric Update since 2014. Previously, he was a staff writer for web hosting magazine and website, theWHIR. For more than a decade, Justin has written for various publications on issues relating to technology, arts and culture, and entertainment. Follow him on Twitter @BiometricJustin.