Fujitsu Laboratories develops method to convert biometric data into cryptographic key

October 26, 2015 - 

Fujitsu Laboratories has developed a new technology that uses randomized numbers to convert biometric data into a cryptographic key for use in encryption and decryption.

The method makes it easier to manage an individual’s private data using biometric information, while preventing the unconverted biometric data from being distributed through the network.

Fujitsu Laboratories said that the technology should make it easier and more convenient to carry out biometric authentication to verify the identity of a person accessing private data managed on the Internet.

Fujitsu, in conjunction with Kyushu University and Saitama University, will present the details of this new technology at the 8th International Symposium on Foundations & Practice of Security (FPS 2015), held in Clermont-Ferrand, France from October 26-28.

Researchers at Fujitsu applied widely used error-correcting codes for the encryption method in order to compensate for errors that are usually generated in the transmission route.

The system — which involves a method that randomly determines different random numbers for encryption and decryption — is designed to protect the private data and biometric data during the encryption process.

The newly developed technology offers two main capabilities including protecting biometric data using error-correcting codes and random numbers, and data recovery of private information using two-stage error-correcting technology.

Using the technology, the cryptographic key management that was previously required for existing encryption technologies is now unnecessary.

Additionally, using encryption technology with biometrics, which could previously only be used within a personal device, can now expand to cloud services across open networks.

Fujitsu Laboratories said it will continue to improve the speed of decryption processing and expand the types of data that can be encrypted.

The company will explore the technology’s applicability to various potential use cases such as the Social Security and Tax Number system in Japan, with the goal of achieving commercialization during fiscal 2017.

Fujitsu researchers will also examine the development of the feature code as well as work to expand the types of applicable biometrics, such as fingerprints.

Previously reported, Japanese payment service JCB Co., Ltd. will be piloting Fujitsu’s palm vein authentication technology for payments at the upcoming JCB World Conference.

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About Justin Lee

Justin Lee has been a contributor with Biometric Update since 2014. Previously, he was a staff writer for web hosting magazine and website, theWHIR. For more than a decade, Justin has written for various publications on issues relating to technology, arts and culture, and entertainment. Follow him on Twitter @BiometricJustin.