Toshiba intros image sensor with iris recognition capabilities

October 9, 2015 - 

Toshiba America Electronic Components, Inc. introduced its first CMOS image sensor with iris recognition capabilites.

The 2.1MP T4KE1 sensor captures images for iris recognition with higher sensitivity than standard CMOS image sensors by excluding the usual color filter in the pixel structure, which significantly increases sensitivity in the near-infrared (NIR) spectrum.

“This is an exciting time for the image sensor business, as new applications and technologies are affording electronics manufacturers wider opportunities for improving their devices’ capabilities,” said Andrew Burt, vice president of the image sensor business unit for TAEC’s System LSI Group. “Toshiba is helping device makers meet these growing requirements by continually introducing innovative technology into our CMOS image sensor family, such as the NIR iris recognition in our new T4KE1.”

The T4KE1’s optical size is 1/7.3 inch and pixel pitch of 1.12 micrometer BSI generates an image output of 60fps at 1080p.

The MIPI CSI-2 serial interface, which is commonly used in mobile devices, enables the sensor to be integrated into end products.

Additionally, the image flipping function allows output images to be easily flipped both horizontally and vertically.

The T4KE1 reference camera module enables users to evaluate use of the sensor in their mobile products.

The modules include design information and technical support to help reduce development turnaround time and contribute to creating thinner, smaller mobile devices.

Samples of the T4KE1 CMOS image sensor are available now, with mass production set to begin in December.

Previously reported, Toshiba unveiled a new top-of-the-line convertible two-in-one laptop, which will be one of the first small-screen PCs to enable facial authentication with Windows Hello.

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About Justin Lee

Justin Lee has been a contributor with Biometric Update since 2014. Previously, he was a staff writer for web hosting magazine and website, theWHIR. For more than a decade, Justin has written for various publications on issues relating to technology, arts and culture, and entertainment. Follow him on Twitter @BiometricJustin.