Apple Pay users warned about storing other people’s fingerprints on their iPhone

November 4, 2015 - 

A number of banks in the UK have warned their customers that if they store other people’s fingerprints on their iPhones, they will be treated as though they have not keep their personal biometrics details secured, according to a report by The Telegraph.

Many banks have stated in their terms and agreements section that they reserve the right to deny a refund for any disputed transactions or refuse to help customers in the event of a fraud claim.

The warning could affect the hundreds of thousands of banking customers who are using iPhones with multiple fingerprints stored on the device in order for other family members to access it.

Apple’s fingerprint authorization feature Touch ID works to unlock phones, as well to authorize payments through Apple Pay.

Since it launched in the UK in July, a growing number of consumers have been using Apple Pay to make purchases at stores, restaurants and on public transport.

The majority of the largest banks in the UK are now accepting Apple Pay, including NatWest, Nationwide Building Society, Llouds, Halifax, Royal Bank of Scotland, Santander, Ulster Bank, MBNA, and HSBC, to name a few.

However, the banks have warned customers that if they decide to use Apple Pay they will need to delete other people’s fingerprints on their device.

For example, Lloyds’ terms and conditions agreement states the following: “If Touch ID is available on your device, you must ensure you only register your own fingerprints (and not anyone else’s).”

HSBC has also warned customers about registering more than one fingerprints profile on their iPhone.

“Our customers’ financial safety and security is of the utmost importance to us, as such we advise all our customers to keep their details as secure as possible,” said an HSBC spokesperson. “This means not sharing their Pin or in the case of Apple Pay not letting others access their phone. We will always endeavour to help our customers should they become a victim of fraud.”

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About Justin Lee

Justin Lee has been a contributor with Biometric Update since 2014. Previously, he was a staff writer for web hosting magazine and website, theWHIR. For more than a decade, Justin has written for various publications on issues relating to technology, arts and culture, and entertainment. Follow him on Twitter @BiometricJustin.