Panasonic providing facial recognition solution to New Jersey Institute of Technology

November 23, 2015 - 

The New Jersey Institute of Technology has deployed Panasonic’s FacePro, facial recognition technology with analytic capabilities, at the school’s libraries to reduce theft issues, according to a report by NJBIZ.

The facial recognition analytics platform for video surveillance systems is able to perform various capabilities including face matching, face searching, people counting, and age and gender statistics.

“Simply by putting cameras up in the library, [NJIT is] reporting to us that the theft has gone down to about zero over the last six months of testing,” said Greg Peratt, VP of security sales at Panasonic North America. “They also know there are individuals that are repeat offenders. Anybody who walks in, their face is captured and, either we do nothing with them or they can be identified as a repeat offender and I can load that in the system. If that person comes on campus or enters the library, it alerts the resource officer on a hand-held device to rectify the situation.”

The solution can also be used for retail and marketing applications, as well as for surveillance to safeguard areas.

“We’re using it at some of our corporate customers to protect their entrances,” said Peratt. “Unfortunately, there are disgruntled employees we hear about in the media who come back. They can load those individuals in the database.”

The PC-based platform can support up to 20 face matching cameras per server, enabling the system to match 1,000 faces a second.

Additionally, the platform can browse from a database of up to five million faces to identify a person in three seconds.

At Security Canada Expo held in October, Panasonic product specialist Rui Barbosa performed a video demonstration of Panasonic FacePro (WV-ASF900).

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About Justin Lee

Justin Lee has been a contributor with Biometric Update since 2014. Previously, he was a staff writer for web hosting magazine and website, theWHIR. For more than a decade, Justin has written for various publications on issues relating to technology, arts and culture, and entertainment. Follow him on Twitter @BiometricJustin.