Motorola, Fujifilm request verdict reversal in lawsuit involving face-detection patents

December 11, 2015 - 

Attorneys representing Fujifilm and Motorola requested a federal judge to reverse a jury verdict and $10.2 million damages in a lawsuit regarding three patents — two of which cover face-recognition technology, according to a report by Courthouse News.

A jury found in May that Motorola did not infringe on three Fujifilm patents, but did infringe on a patent involving the monochrome conversion of color images.

Fujifilm was awarded $10.2 million in damages — an award Motorola said was not supported by sufficient evidence.

On Wednesday, the attorneys debated the jury’s findings and admissibility of expert testimony presented at trial.

Addressing the face-detection patents, Fujifilm attorney Thomas Kenworthy stated that the jury improperly heard expert testimony on claim construction definitions.

He argued that the jury should have been allowed to consider only the “plain and ordinary meaning” of patent claims.

Kenworthy said Motorola’s claim that a second step in its facial-recognition scanning process prevented the technology from infringing on Fuji’s patent was based entirely on expert witness Alan Bovik’s improper claim construction testimony.

In response, Motorola attorney James Isbester said that Fujifilm’s expert, Barbara Frederiksen-Cross, delivered an improper testimony by showing a modified chart to the jury and attempted to refute Motorola’s assertions that the second step of its face-scanning technology disproved infringement claims.

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About Justin Lee

Justin Lee has been a contributor with Biometric Update since 2014. Previously, he was a staff writer for web hosting magazine and website, theWHIR. For more than a decade, Justin has written for various publications on issues relating to technology, arts and culture, and entertainment. Follow him on Twitter @BiometricJustin.