Synaptics Natural ID featured in USB fingerprint dongles from Kensington, PQI

January 9, 2017 - 

Synaptics’ Natural ID fingerprint sensors are featured on new retail USB dongles manufactured by Kensington and PQI.

Both the Kensington VeriMark Fingerprint Key and the PQI My Lockey enable notebook PC users to add a fingerprint authentication feature to their devices lacking an integrated biometric sensor.

The fully housed, ready-to-use fingerprint modules are compact in size, allowing them to go relatively unnoticeable while installed in any notebook USB port.

Once the user enrollment process is completed, the fingerprint sensor can authorize the user with a single touch of a finger. This will grant the user rapid PC access and the full use of Windows Hello and Microsoft Passport.

Synaptics Natural ID solutions are FIDO Certified (Fast IDentity Online), which provides a wide range of compliance with an industry-wide ecosystem of products.

“Due to the rapid growth of online payments, combined with the critical need for protecting access to PC data for businesses and consumers, biometric authentication has become the de facto standard for high performance security,” said Godfrey Cheng, vice president of marketing at Synaptics’ human interface systems division (HISD).

“These new Kensington and PQI USB dongles enable users to easily add fingerprint sensing to new and older Windows 10-based PCs. Our unique fingerprint sensors also feature Synaptics’ SentryPoint technology, offering Quantum Matcher with PurePrint anti-spoof technology. PurePrint examines fingerprint images using unique artificial intelligence technology to distinguish between fake and actual fingers.”

Last week, Synaptics announced that its Natural ID fingerprint sensors and ClearPad touchscreen controllers are now featured on the new ASUS ZenFone AR smartphone.

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About Justin Lee

Justin Lee has been a contributor with Biometric Update since 2014. Previously, he was a staff writer for web hosting magazine and website, theWHIR. For more than a decade, Justin has written for various publications on issues relating to technology, arts and culture, and entertainment. Follow him on Twitter @BiometricJustin.