Patent pending paste promises precise palm prints

February 2, 2017 - 

Applied World Solution has developed Minutia Advancement Paste (M.A.P.), a proprietary and patent pending paste that can be applied to the palm and fingertips before being enrolled in a fingerprint livescan system to ensure the highest quality image capture.

Company founder Justin Turvey, a police officer and former U.S. Marine Sergeant, said the paste is designed to increase the accuracy of biometric fingerprint and palm scans used in security systems.

“While I was working with the bureau of criminal investigations in Plymouth County in Massachusetts, I saw the need to find a way to solve more crimes with the use of biometrics,” said Turvey. “The better the print, the more likely you will be to find a match within the system. This product can improve the process and create a safer community.”

M.A.P. darkens light images caused by dry skin, provides an even contrast over the entire scan, and provides clear scans of ridge detail.

The product also allows users to achieve passing scans with fewer rejects, enables users to submit the best possible image of finger and palm prints, and prevents over-application due to its solid form.

The non-toxic paste contains a safe antimicrobial ingredient that prevents the spread of bacteria, and is neither sticky nor greasy.

“The paste contains a moisturizing agent that slightly swells the ridges on the fingers and palms, allowing for a more accurate and detailed print,” said Turvey. “It is a safe product that is less likely to spread germs, uses natural oils that lead to clearer images and it is alcohol free. There is no chance of interfering in breathalyzer tests or of degrading the silicone pads used on some scanning machines.”

M.A.P. is available on Applied World Solutions‘ website.

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About Justin Lee

Justin Lee has been a contributor with Biometric Update since 2014. Previously, he was a staff writer for web hosting magazine and website, theWHIR. For more than a decade, Justin has written for various publications on issues relating to technology, arts and culture, and entertainment. Follow him on Twitter @BiometricJustin.