NIH study proves effectiveness of facial recognition medication adherence tool

April 10, 2017 - 

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) published a new study that proves the effectiveness of AiCure‘s medication adherence solution, which uses a form of artificial intelligence (AI) for facial recognition to confirm that patients have taken the correct medication, according to a report by Med City News.

The findings, which were published in the medical journal Stroke, were based on a 12-week randomized controlled trial that measured the tool’s effect on adherence rates for diabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban and warfarin compared with a control group.

Researchers took plasma samples from 28 participants (a group with an average age of 57 years old), who each had an ischemic stroke, in an effort to quantify the effectiveness of the tool.

The findings showed that all of the patients using AiCure took their medication but only 50 percent or six out of 12 patients in the control group took the anticoagulants.

Medications that have to be taken over a long-term period, such as anticoagulants, tend to be associated with poor adherence.

Journal of the American Heart Association published a study that found that the need to improve adherence is less appreciated in anticoagulation therapy because, in the past, a low prescription rate was largely responsible for underuse.

As a result, increased physician adherence to prescribing guidelines has helped improve prescription rates in past decades.

Medication adherence is especially crucial for stroke patients because first-time stroke victims are at a growing risk of experiencing another stroke over time, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control.

AiCure’s solution, which provides effective remote monitoring support for clinical trials, could improve adherence for clinical trials and improve the quality of these test results.

The company closed a $12.2 million Series A round in 2016, as well as raised an additional $7 million from NIH competitive innovation grants to support the development of its platform for drug research and therapy.

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About Justin Lee

Justin Lee has been a contributor with Biometric Update since 2014. Previously, he was a staff writer for web hosting magazine and website, theWHIR. For more than a decade, Justin has written for various publications on issues relating to technology, arts and culture, and entertainment. Follow him on Twitter @BiometricJustin.