Apple issued patents for bezel-free display, in screen Touch ID button on future iPhone

May 23, 2017 - 

Apple Inc. recently published 56 patents it was granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, which includes an edge-to-edge display and an in-screen Touch ID button for future iPhones, according to a report by Tech Digg.

Patent #9,652,096, which covers an edge-to-edge display for future iPhones, describes a predominantly flat-screen setting where the curved sides help facilitate greater symmetry and a more seamless design.

The invention relates to the bending of one or more edges around the display panel, effectively lowering the non-interactive border area for the device.

In the application, Apple said that it intends to decrease the border area, which is known as the bezel, so that it maximizes the display and interactive touch areas for iPhones.

The company also said that a flexible material could be used to allow the display to bend. Organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays will soon have this capacity, as has been already seen on several smartphones.

Apple also said another benefit of bending the sides of the panel is that it would allow for a narrower smartphone.

Patent #9,652,066, on the other hand, describes a fingerprint sensor that is integrated directly to the display, which would allow iPhone owners to easily access the Touch ID sensor while they are using applications.

As such, the in-screen sensor would allow Apple to remove the home button from the front panel and increase the size of the display for future iPhones.

Last month, a leaked picture of an alleged schematic for the Apple iPhone 8 hinted that Apple may change the location of the fingerprint reader.

However, there is still a strong chance Apple might switch up its plans considering reports that the company is having issues with the mass production of the iPhone 8.

The patent application also reveals that the main fingerprint reading may not occur at the level of the screen. Instead, input from the sensor panel is converted for processing to different parts of the device.

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About Justin Lee

Justin Lee has been a contributor with Biometric Update since 2014. Previously, he was a staff writer for web hosting magazine and website, theWHIR. For more than a decade, Justin has written for various publications on issues relating to technology, arts and culture, and entertainment. Follow him on Twitter @BiometricJustin.