BioSec palm vein authentication system prevents violence at Hungarian stadium

July 10, 2017 - 

The BioSec Group installation of a biometric palm vein authentication system at Hungarian Groupama Arena has put an end to the football spectator violence that would occasionally occur at the 23,500 seated soccer stadium.

StadiumGuard is a palm vein scanner that grants access to thousands of ticket holders into the stadium, while keeping unsavory types outside.

The technology works by fans waving their hand above the sensor at one of the stadium’s 36 gates. If the person is not blacklisted, the sensor will immediately activate a green light.

Since installing the security system in 2014, the stadium has had zero acts of violence, zero pyrotechnics and zero racist abuse.

BioSec Group said it understands that it takes some time for people to adapt a system that is significantly different than anything they have experienced in the past.

Despite the more than 100,000 registered users for the system at Groupama Arena, there are many fans that are still against the technology.

“In people’s minds, access control is equal to tickets, cards and PIN codes, so it is understandable that they have doubts when it comes to something that is not like what they were used to,” said Péter Györgydeák, CEO of BioSec Group. “On the other hand, as people are using the technology, they experience its benefits immediately, which are quite convincing. Just like seeing mothers bringing their children to the games, which is the greatest compliment for me.”

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About Justin Lee

Justin Lee has been a contributor with Biometric Update since 2014. Previously, he was a staff writer for web hosting magazine and website, theWHIR. For more than a decade, Justin has written for various publications on issues relating to technology, arts and culture, and entertainment. Follow him on Twitter @BiometricJustin.