About Kayla Matthews

Kayla Matthews is a biometrics and technology writer who contributes to VentureBeat, VICE, MakeUseOf and The Week. To read more posts from Kayla, you can follow her blog Productivity Bytes.

This bank in Thailand enabled biometric access for their mobile app

Passwords have long been an outdated form of authentication, and are often the weak link in an otherwise solid security process. The world’s most popular password is 123456, with the second being 123456789. Ouch. Mobile devices are now being developed to include a new form of authentication related to biometric data. In short, the technology allows you to unlock your device via your fingerprint, voice, facial contours and even your iris pattern. When it works, it’s a neat way to

The conflicting state of biometrics support and acceptance

This is a guest post by Kayla Matthews, a biometrics and technology writer. Since the Internet is foundational to almost every aspect of modern life, we regularly endeavor to make it a safer and more comfortable place to be. A big part of that journey is making our authentication methods — passwords, encryption and biometrics — stronger and more dependable. But biometrics, in particular, have struggled with adoption and an apparent lack of public trust. With cyberthreats increasingly a top-of-mind

How biometrics can fight synthetic identity fraud

This is a guest post by Kayla Matthews, a biometrics and technology writer. Identity fraud is a major issue today, and it’s only getting more advanced. You may think people who engage in stealing identities take details from single individuals and assume those personas. That practice still occurs sometimes, but synthetic identity fraud is even more widespread. The basics of synthetic identity fraud People involved in synthetic identity fraud take bits of information from various victims and combine it. They

Why are under-display fingerprint sensors the next goal in biometrics?

This is a guest post by Kayla Matthews, a biometrics and technology writer. The race to create an effective under-display fingerprint sensor that can also be economically mass-produced is on. But what’s the big deal? Why do so many companies in the biometrics industry want to get in on this new technology? Screens Take Over Smartphone fingerprint scanners that can be used to verify identity and unlock a phone, authorize a purchase or start a download are now common. However,

3 things needed before biometrics can go mainstream

This is a guest post by Kayla Matthews, a biometrics and technology writer. Biometrics have started to gain more ground and visibility in the world market. Expected to be worth $34 billion USD by 2022, the global biometrics market is an exciting industry to be apart of, indeed. Yet, though the potential advantages of using biometrics are many, a few things need to happen before we can really start implementing this technology in its full capacity. 1. Better Data Breach

Will biometrics improve payment card security?

This is a guest post by Kayla Matthews, a biometrics and technology writer. Most of us are familiar with the concept of biometrics — the science of using fingerprints and other unique identifiers to increase security. Many smartphones are already equipped with fingerprint scanners that people can use instead of entering a password or PIN to secure their phone. Could this biometric technology be used to secure other things we use every day, like debit and credit cards? Biometrics and

Security cameras in the UK will scan thousands of soccer fans’ faces in June

This is a guest post by Kayla Matthews, a biometrics and technology writer. From airport body scanners to metal detectors at museums, we’ve become accustomed to increasingly advanced forms of security in public places. However, security officials in the United Kingdom will take things to the next level by using security cameras with face scanners. Learn how this particular advancement might affect human safety, as well as how the security field has changed in recent years. Football Fans and Others