What are biometrics?

Biometrics Research Group, Inc. defines biometrics as measurable physical and behavioral characteristics that enable the establishment and verification of an individual’s identity. Biometrics is the process by which a person’s unique physical and other traits are detected and recorded by an electronic device or system as a means of confirming identity. The term “biometrics” derives from the word “biometry”, which refers to the statistical analysis of biological observations and phenomena. Since biometric identifiers are unique to individuals, they are more

Explainer: Facial Recognition

Biometrics Research Group, Inc. defines facial recognition as technology that measures distances between specific parts of a person’s face as a mode for identification. People typical use faces to recognize other individuals. Advancements in computing over the past few decades has now enabled similar recognition automatically. Early face recognition algorithms used simple geometric models, but the recognition process has now matured into a science of sophisticated mathematical representations and matching processes. Major advancements and initiatives in the past 10 to

Explainer: Signature Recognition

Biometrics Research Group, Inc. defines signature recognition as a behavioural biometric that identifies an individual on the basis of their handwritten text. Writing is human physical expression but concurrently an acquired skill. Signature recognition requires an individual to supply a sample of text which serves as a base of measurement of their writing. The purpose of the signature recognition process is to identify the writer of a given sample, while the purpose of a signature verification process is to confirm

Explainer: Fingerprint Matching

Biometrics Research Group, Inc. defines fingerprint identification as an automated method of verifying a match between two human fingerprints. Over the years, fingerprint identification has become one of the most well-known and publicized biometric modalities. Because of their uniqueness and consistency over time, fingerprints have been used for identification for over a century. The first recorded use of fingerprints for identification was in 1858. With advances in computing capabilities by the 1960s, fingerprint identification is now a highly automated technique.

Explainer: Big Data

Big Data is a term used to describe large and complex data sets that can provide insightful conclusions when analyzed and visualized in a meaningful way. Conventional database tools do not have capabilities to manage large volumes of unstructured data. Big Data is typically defined as a collection of data sets so large and complex that it becomes difficult to process using on-hand database management tools or traditional data processing applications. Relational database management systems and desktop statistics and visualization

Explainer: Mobile ID

Mobile identity, otherwise referred to as Mobile ID solutions, deliver authentication and authorization for mobile applications and services. Mobile ID works to securely extend identity services and policies to mobile devices through authentication, policy enforcement, and single sign-on between applications. Typically, Mobile ID uses online authentication and digital signatures, vis-a-vis the SIM card of a mobile device as an identity tool. A subscriber identity module, or SIM card, is an integrated circuit issued by a service provider that securely stores

Explainer: Electronic ID (eID)

An eID card is typically a government-issued document for online and offline identification. The typical electronic identity card has the format of a regular bank card, with printed identity information on the surface, such as personal details and a photograph, as well as an embedded microchip. An eID is more reliable than paper-based ID because it provides more data security with built-in privacy features. The use of digital signatures makes it harder or even impossible to make a forged ID

History of Biometrics

Introduction The term “biometrics” is derived from the Greek words “bio” (life) and “metrics” (to measure). Automated biometric systems have only become available over the last few decades, due to significant advances in the field of computer processing. Many of these new automated techniques, however, are based on ideas that were originally conceived hundreds, even thousands of years ago. One of the oldest and most basic examples of a characteristic that is used for recognition by humans is the face.

Explainer: Two-Factor Authentication (2FA)

Two-factor authentication, or 2FA, is a method of accessing computing and financial resources or physical facilities, with more than just a password or personal information number (PIN or passcode). Using a singular password or passcode to access such resources makes a user susceptible to security threats, because it represents a only a single piece of information that a malicious person needs to acquire. The additional security that 2FA provides thus ensures that additional information is required to sign in to

Explainer: Value Added Resellers in the biometrics sector

A value added reseller is an IT vendor that takes an existing, separate product and adds their own value to it, usually in the form of a specific new application. The value added reseller therefore combines a new service with an existing product and is defined by the fact that they add features or services, usually to the benefit of end-users. Value added resellers ultimately provide an integrated end product that constitutes a turnkey solution. Instead of a technology end-user