Explainer: Two-Factor Authentication (2FA)

Two-factor authentication, or 2FA, is a method of accessing computing and financial resources or physical facilities, with more than just a password or personal information number (PIN or passcode). Using a singular password or passcode to access such resources makes a user susceptible to security threats, because it represents a only a single piece of information that a malicious person needs to acquire. The additional security that 2FA provides thus ensures that additional information is required to sign in to

Explainer: Value Added Resellers in the biometrics sector

A value added reseller is an IT vendor that takes an existing, separate product and adds their own value to it, usually in the form of a specific new application. The value added reseller therefore combines a new service with an existing product and is defined by the fact that they add features or services, usually to the benefit of end-users. Value added resellers ultimately provide an integrated end product that constitutes a turnkey solution. Instead of a technology end-user

Explainer: Palm print recognition

Palm print recognition inherently implements many of the same matching characteristics that have allowed fingerprint recognition to be one of the most well-known and best publicized biometrics. Both palm and finger biometrics are represented by the information presented in a friction ridge impression. This information combines ridge flow, ridge characteristics, and ridge structure of the raised portion of the epidermis. The data represented by these friction ridge impressions allows a determination that corresponding areas of friction ridge impressions either originated

Explainer: Biometrics in Law Enforcement

Law enforcement is arguably the largest user of biometric technology and Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems (AFIS) is the police’s most utilized biometric tool. Automated fingerprint identification is the process automatically matching one or many unknown fingerprints against a database of known and unknown prints. Automated fingerprint identification systems are primarily used by law enforcement agencies in order to identify a person suspected of committing a crime or linking a suspect to other unsolved crimes. AFIS is a biometric identification (ID)

Explainer: Biometric ATMs

Biometric ATMs are self-service automated teller machines (ATMs), or cash machines, that use a biometric measure to identify customers and allow them to withdraw cash. Biometric authentication may be the only customer identifier used, or it may be used in conjunction with another format, such as a payment card, a mobile device or an additional security credential, such as a PIN. The biometric measures used generally include palm or finger vein print biometrics, although they may also include other functionalities

Explainer: Gesture recognition

Gesture recognition has been defined as the mathematical interpretation of a human motion by a computing device.  Gestures can originate from any bodily motion or state but commonly originate from the face or hand. Ideally, gesture recognition enables humans to communicate with machines and interact naturally without any mechanical intermediaries.  Utilizing sensors that detect body motion, gesture recognition makes it possible to control devices such as televisions, computers and video games, primarily with hand or finger movement. With this technology

Explainer: Mobile Biometrics

Mobile biometrics refers to the deployment of biometric authentication methods on mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets. Use cases for mobile biometrics include securing sensitive data on personal or corporate mobile devices such as enterprise or financial information, providing physical access to corporate facilities and providing mobile identity management tools to national security and law enforcement agencies. Over the past few years, mobile devices have become a key computing platform, transforming how people access business and personal information. Access

Explainer: Finger Vein Recognition

Finger vein recognition is a method of biometric authentication that uses pattern recognition techniques based on images of human finger vein patterns beneath the skin’s surface. Finger vein recognition is used to identify individuals and to verify their identity. Finger vein recognition is a biometric authentication system that matches the vascular pattern in an individual’s finger to previously obtained data. Hitachi developed and patented a finger vein identification system in 2005. The technology is mainly used for credit card authentication,

Explainer: Footprint identification

Footprint identification is the measurement of footprint features for recognizing the identity of a user. A footprint is a universal and easy way to capture a personal “identifier” which does not change much over time. Footprint-based measurements constitutes one of many new possibilities to realize biometric authentication.  It is an experimental technology that is currently under development at a number of universities and research institutes. Footprint identification is projected to become a new emerging alternative to access control in wellness

Explainer: Healthcare and Medical Biometrics

Healthcare biometrics refers to biometric applications in doctors’ offices, hospitals, or for use in monitoring patients. This can include access control, identification, workforce management or patient record storage. Many hospitals and healthcare organizations are currently deploying biometric security architecture. Secure identification is critical in the health care system, both to control logical access to centralized archives of digitized patients’ data, and to limit physical access to buildings and hospital wards, and to authenticate medical and social support personnel. There is