Minnesota Courts rule that suspects must provide fingerprint to unlock phones

Earlier this week, the Minnesota Court of Appeals ruled that a judge’s order instructing a man to submit his fingerprint in order to unlock his smartphone was constitutional, a move that is consistent with similar rulings across the country according to a report by TwinCities.com. The decision relates to a case involving a Minnesota man who attempted to have his burglary and theft convictions repealed in connection to a 2014 robbery in Chaska. The attorney for Matthew Diamond asserted that

Facebook claims it can collect user biometric data without consent

Ongoing advances in facial recognition technology enable companies to potentially profit from their user base’s biometric data, and privacy advocates have drawn a pattern in how Facebook and Google have sold users’ viewing histories for advertising, according to a report by Chicago Business. Both Facebook and Google state that collecting facial biometrics data isn’t against the law, even without the user’s consent. If judges side with Facebook and Google, the companies may be able to throw out any lawsuits filed

Documents reveal UK government’s out-of-court settlements over unlawful biometrics storage

The UK Home Office has been attempting to keep under wraps three out-of-court settlements with claimants who accused the police of unlawfully storing their biometric information, according to a report by The Register. Independent Biometrics Commissioner, Alastair MacGregor QC, overseeing the government’s use of biometric data, has repeatedly brought up issues in the past regarding the retention of the biometrics of arrested individuals. The Commissioner wrote in his annual report for 2015 that based on the PNC’s “limitations”, it was

Mastercard appeal denied in case over legal fees brought on by SmartMetric patent infringement case

SmartMetric announced yesterday that the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit denied the Mastercard appeal in which Mastercard appealed the ruling of the Federal Circuit Courts decision against Mastercard’s motion for legal fees of more than $1.5 million against SmartMetric. In 2013, U.S. District Judge Michael W. Fitzgerald in Los Angeles ruled that Visa and MasterCard did not infringe on a patent owned by SmartMetric. Visa and Mastercard then sought $3 million in legal fees and costs

EU finds some countries not fingerprinting migrants and refugees, starts legal procedures

The EU executive has started legal procedures against Croatia, Greece, and Italy for not registering migrants and refugees in the EU-wide fingerprint database, Eurodac, when they first arrive on the continent. According to reports in the EU Observer, between July 20 and the end of November, Frontex, the EU’s border agency, found that 65,000 migrants arrived by sea in Italy, but only 29,000 were fingerprinted and entered into the database. In Greece, 492,000 arrivals were registered and only 121,000 fingerprinted.

Rapid DNA data from IntegenX system used in court to secure conviction in murder trial

IntegenX announced that results from its RapidHIT system were used in a U.S. court to secure a conviction in an attempted murder case in Richland County, South Carolina. IntegenX said that is the first time in the U.S. that results from its RapidHIT® System were used in court to obtain a conviction. The RapidHIT System is a fully automated sample-to-answer system for STR-based human identification. The self-contained human identification system generates standardized DNA profiles from buccal swabs and other human

Motorola, Fujifilm request verdict reversal in lawsuit involving face-detection patents

Attorneys representing Fujifilm and Motorola requested a federal judge to reverse a jury verdict and $10.2 million damages in a lawsuit regarding three patents — two of which cover face-recognition technology, according to a report by Courthouse News. A jury found in May that Motorola did not infringe on three Fujifilm patents, but did infringe on a patent involving the monochrome conversion of color images. Fujifilm was awarded $10.2 million in damages — an award Motorola said was not supported

Indian Government argues Aadhaar card usage voluntary

The Indian government admitted to India’s Supreme Court that Aadhaar cardholders can opt out of the unique identification scheme if they wish by blocking data embedded on the cards. “The making of the card is voluntary,” stated Attorney General Mukul Rohatgi, in front of the court yesterday. “Using the card is voluntary and not only this, a cardholder can block it too. If a person wants to block the information about him contained in the biometric database, he can do

Former UIDAI chairman calls for appeal of Aadhaar court decision

Nandan Nilekani, the former chairman of the Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI), today argued in an opinion piece published in the Indian Express that the recent Supreme Court decision limiting Aadhaar use should be appealed. BiometricUpdate.com reported in August that the court placed a highly restrictive cease order on the national Indian government concerning its use of Aadhaar data. Under the new court order, the use of Aadhaar is restricted to the distribution of liquid propane gas, kerosene and

India’s privacy court decision to affect government databases

The “right to privacy” reference question now before India’s Supreme Court will have major implications concerning the cross-linking of Aadhaar and ancillary biometric registries to other government databases. Petitioners recently asked the court to protect constitutional rights to privacy. The government, on the other hand, is seeking to declare that a “right to privacy” does not formally exist. If the court ultimately determines that the right is not existent, then the national government will legally be able to use Aadhaar