Iris biometrics-protected USB flash drive blows past Kickstarter goal in 2 days

Days after its launch, eyeDisk has surpassed the $10,000 goal of the Kickstarter campaign for its USB flash drive secured with iris recognition, which it bills as unhackable, and the most secure USB flash drive available on Kickstarter.

The product integrates an infrared iris scan with a 32GB or 128GB flash drive, compatible with Windows and macOS, secured with binocular or monocular biometric identification. The scan works from a distance between approximately 15 and 25cm, and has a false acceptance rate (FAR) below 0.0001 percent, and a false rejection rate (FRR) of below 0.1 percent in 0.5 seconds, according to the announcement and its Kickstarter page. The company says iris biometrics are 15 times more secure than facial recognition, 150 times more secure than fingerprint encryption, and is the most reliable biometric modality other than DNA.

“Biometrics have come a long way beginning with fingerprint scanners and facial recognition but both of those methods can be compromised. Today, iris recognition is the most secure method of authentication available. Combined with data encryption, it is the safest way to store valuable personal and business data,” says Jerry Wang, founder of eyeDisk.

Matching is performed on the device, and the USB drive is encrypted with AES-256 military-level key generation. The certified-safe IR LED is the same one used by Samsung and Google, eyeDisk says, and meets the IEC-62471 safe use standard. The system also includes one-click backup, and devices can be custom-engraved.

Early-bird pricing through Kickstarter starts at $49, with an MSRP of $99 for the 32GB model and $178 for the 128GB model. Pilot testing is planned for December, with shipping beginning in March 2019.

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