Startup Global e·dentity raises funds and receives patent for innovative biometric system

Categories Biometric R&D  |  Biometrics News

Multi-factor biometrics and digital identity startup Global e·dentity has been granted a patent by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) for identifying people by their subcutaneous vascular patterns and surface bone structure features, as well as secured its first funding round, according to a company announcement.

The patent for “Biometric Authentication of Individuals Utilizing Subcutaneous Biometrics” describes a system the company calls “Universal ID” (U.I.D.), which it says is non-invasive, yet far more accurate and reliable than those currently in use.

“It is a game changer. Our technology is leaps ahead of older and less reliable systems like fingerprints, retina scans, and facial recognition currently being used by other companies. Furthermore, using our multi-factor identification, it can be built into glasses or such like those from Facebook, Google and Apple” says Global e·dentity Founder Robert Adams.

The system uses ultrasound and near infrared (NIR) spectrum in combination, and includes measuring heartbeat and blood-flow as two proofs of liveness. The company’s proprietary AI updates personal characteristics in the database over time, as they grow and change. The unique features of the system also make it protective of personal privacy, and make identity theft nearly impossible, according to the announcement. Machine learning is applied to secure authentication solution using blockchain and military-grade encryption, and allows logical or physical access without use of a card or other credential.

“We have finalized phase III of our proof of concept. The design continues to evolve; we have a nice roadmap of technology improvements for the coming years. Now that the patent has been issued, we will begin initiating partnerships because of the overwhelming demand for U.I.D. from countries and manufacturers around the world. Our biggest challenge,” Adams continues, “is discovering all the potential uses for this method and our technology.”

The unspecified funding round comes from an unnamed Washington, D.C. entity.

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