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Apple biometrics updates: side-mounted sensor for new iPad, no Face ID for iPhone SE 3

iOS 15.4 with mask recognition to come out next week
Apple biometrics updates: side-mounted sensor for new iPad, no Face ID for iPhone SE 3

Apple held its Peek Performance event earlier this week, unveiling a number of new products and updates, including familiar device biometric features.

Among them are a new version of the iPhone SE featuring the company’s latest mobile processor A15 and 5G, a new desktop Mac and iPad Air devices, and an external monitor.

In terms of biometrics, the iPhone SE 3 does not change much when compared to its predecessor, retaining its Touch ID fingerprint sensor, but not yet supporting Face ID.

Likewise, the changes in the new iPad Air 5 are mostly internal, with Apple’s tablets now including the firm’s in-house M1 Ultra chips. The company has also added a 12-megapixel camera and (finally) a USB-C port.

Just like the iPhone SE 3, the iPad Air 5 does not support Face ID, which only works with iPad Pro models. Instead, the Apple tablet supports biometrics unlock via the traditional, side-mounted Touch ID sensor.

For context, there are currently rumors hinting that Apple is planning to ditch fingerprint sensors on future iPhones, pushing instead toward the full adoption of Face ID.

At the Peek Performance event, Apple also confirmed the highly-anticipated iOS 15.4 update will come out next week.

A bit late in the game perhaps, but the update will offer the ability to use Face ID while wearing a mask as well as periocular biometric capabilities.

Additionally, iOS 15.4 will introduce a new “gender-neutral” voice for Siri, which Apple confirmed was recorded by a member of the LGBTQ+ community.

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