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UK tests biometric breath analysis

UK tests biometric breath analysis
 

The county of Nottinghamshire in the UK is set to become the first jurisdiction in Europe to trial an alcohol breath analysis device that incorporates biometric face matching, reports the Newark Advertiser.

SCRAM Systems’ one-piece handheld device is designed to measure sobriety. It can be used with low-risk subjects who are subject to ongoing monitoring following a conviction on criminal charges related to alcohol abuse.

The company has been selling the devices in the United States since at least 2016. And third-party suppliers have pushed the idea on automakers for a number of years.

It differs from conventional analyzers in its facial verification software, which records a picture of the person using the device and compares it to a face template as it is being used. The biometric version is less invasive than traditional versions, according to the Advertiser.

Two breath analyses have been conducted so far during the Nottinghamshire trial. The Newark Advertiser said the tests have been conducted voluntarily. Nottinghamshire’s Police and Crime Commissioner is overseeing the trial.

Subjects are automatically prompted when to use the device.

It features text reminders and offers various testing options for officials, including random, on-demand and scheduled tests.

It also sends real-time alerts to officials for every incident of noncompliance.

A research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice years ago shows the extent of the company’s reach in the North American market.

According to the document, SCRAM products, including ankle monitors, are used in the majority of U.S. states and in some circuit and district courts.

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