US Army seeks base entry control biometrics proposals

US Army seeks base entry control biometrics proposals

U.S. Army officers want proposals for two biometric access control systems and one biometric data cleaning application.

One proposed project, called Pandemic Entry and Automated Control Environment (with the Strangelovian acronym Peace), would replace the common access cards carried by Army personnel. The cards offer access to bases, some computers and commissary goods.

They also are potential carriers of viruses and (more realistically) an attractive target for thieves.

The successful replacement would combine the debatable security of a password with the unique biometric data of personnel. Officers foresee the possibility of using the system to control access to weapons and weapon platforms.

There is no requirement that submissions contain face, iris, fingerprint or other biometrics.

Proposals will be accepted from April 14 to noon Eastern Time May 18.

News has also emerged of several other Army proposal requests and contracts related to biometrics.

A $22 million contract has been awarded to Microsoft for augmented reality headsets, meanwhile, to help train soldiers to recognize targets and threats in the field, the Toronto Star reports. The helmets, based on the company’s HoloLens headsets, can integrate thermal night vision and facial recognition. The deal is for five years, with possible extensions for another five.

Officers also want to see ideas for an entry-control camera to be integrated with the Army’s automated installation entry system now in use. A successful submission would be able to see through the windshield of vehicles five to 15 meters (15 to 45 feet) from the lens and moving up to 10 mph in all weather and lighting conditions without error.

Finally, the Army wants proposals for what might sound mundane, but that which likely will have a bigger impact than the two access control projects.

They are looking for a machine learning app to identify errors and improve data quality in the Defense Department’s central biometric database.

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