Innerscope Research monitors biometrics in ad engagement study

April 30, 2015 - 

Innerscope Research has published a new biometric study that finds that traditional TV commercials are four times more engaging than video advertising on Facebook, according to a report by MediaPost.

Using biometric monitoring, eye-tracking and traditional survey methods, Innerscope was able to measure the nonconscious and conscious responses of 390 consumers, ages 18 to 34, to the same video advertisements across Facebook, TV and digital pre-roll on PC, tablet and smartphone.

According to Innerscope, the study was a “client commissioned” survey, although it did not disclose the name of the client.

The research firm captured the biometric data using technology to record fluctuations in heart rate, skin conductance and breathing patterns.

The report also finds that consumers have a “higher visual attention” with final branding moments and brand logos on TV advertising — which Innerscope attributes to larger screen sizes — than when viewing the ads online on another device.

In keeping with results from biometric and eye tracking data, 47% of consumers said they immediately skip or ignore a video ad on Facebook before watching it.

Another key finding is that 25% of consumers being more likely to admit they would try or buy target brands after watching the ads on TV, while just 9% of consumers watching the ads on Facebook admitted they would do the same.

Additionally, smaller screens play a significant role in reducing video ad impact, where visual attention spent on branding moments, logos and taglines lowered with screen size.

“Our studies continue to show that consumers bring different mindsets and expectations to various media platforms,” said Dr. Carl Marci, co-founder/chief science officer for Innerscope Research.

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About Justin Lee

Justin Lee has been a contributor with Biometric Update since 2014. Previously, he was a staff writer for web hosting magazine and website, theWHIR. For more than a decade, Justin has written for various publications on issues relating to technology, arts and culture, and entertainment. Follow him on Twitter @BiometricJustin.